Feminism and Race: Just Who Counts as a Woman of Color?

Black and white image of Asian women marching in the streets, fists raised and using bullhorns. To their right is a purple text box with a quote that reads "I've been told since high school that Asian-Americans are not relevant, that our voices and experiences matter only when high-schoolers turn their pages to the obligatory paragraphs in their world history readers that briefly address Chinese railroad workers...This dismissive attitude toward Asian-Americans causes a dangerous rift in the ever-evolving journey toward true solidarity and the dismantling of racial and gender hierarchies." Lindsey Yoo's name is underneath. The red POC logo is at the bottom of the frame.

Black and white image of Asian women marching in the streets, fists raised and using bullhorns. To their right is a purple text box with a quote that reads "I've been told since high school that Asian-Americans are not relevant, that our voices and experiences matter only when high-schoolers turn their pages to the obligatory paragraphs in their world history readers that briefly address Chinese railroad workers...This dismissive attitude toward Asian-Americans causes a dangerous rift in the ever-evolving journey toward true solidarity and the dismantling of racial and gender hierarchies." Lindsey Yoo's name is underneath. The red POC logo is at the bottom of the frame.

In this brief personal essay, Yoo discusses being a socially active Asian American woman in a nation that often views race in a black-white binary. In her experience, Asian Americans are left out of the conversation of race completely, or are considered “white” (part of the model minority stereotype). She argues that conversations of racial justice and civil rights history often ignore Asian-Americans despite their experiences with racism and anti-immigration rhetoric, and history of activism. This essay explores the importance of inclusion in feminist conversations.

READ IT HERE!


POC Online Classroom strives to make readings and resources that celebrate the intellectual tradition and knowledge production of marginalized communities more accessible. Rad Reading is a new series that highlight texts to read and writers to support! We will post every Tuesday and Thursday.